Each year I receive numerous questions from returning students on how to add an internship to an already full-page resume.  Students struggle with what to delete in order to fit the job description and accomplishments from their internship onto the page.  How do they decide what to delete in order to add more information?  Can they have a two-page resume? 

If you only have a certain amount of space to demonstrate your value to a potential employer, you need to identify what information MUST be on your resume and not focus so much on what to delete.  Too often, especially early in our careers, we work to add as much information as possible to our resumes to fill the page.  Then, once we start getting substance to our portfolios we struggle with that to delete.  Your goal is to have a resume that promotes the value you will offer potential employers.   Can one have a two-page resume as an undergrad or graduate student?  While some people will say some graduate students can certainly have a two-page resume, most still say keep it to one page.   Regardless of the length, the purpose of a resume remains to be a document that grabs the attention of the reader to promote knowledge, skills and abilities. 

After completing an internship, you should see that this experience is what needs to be on your resume as opposed to bullet points from previous jobs.  You will start to distinguish between your work history and professional experience.  Jobs that allow you the opportunity to demonstrate your ability and value towards your future career goals will take the place of jobs in which you answered the phone for a parent’s company or other part time jobs. 

Each time you add something to your resume, decide whether this experience is better suited to market your ability in the future or just state what you did in the past.  Your high school experiences helped you get into a great college or university; your college experiences help you land a great entry-level position.

Who likes writing objective statements?  Who actually reads objective statements?  My guess is that the answer to both of those questions is a NO!  Objective statements are outdated and should not be used anymore. 

So, you might be asking yourself, what do I write at the top of my resume to show an employer what I’m seeking?  The answer is much more interesting to both write and read.  Write a BRANDING STATEMENT!

When you purchase any product, you search for traits and qualities that meet your needs.  Through a targeted marketing campaign, the seller showcases their product’s value.  The value that a product can contribute is what the customer wants to read and subsequently buy. The same holds true for a resume.

Employers want to see how you can meet their needs.  By writing a quality branding statement, you will not only articulate what you can do for a potential employer but will also state your goals if written effectively.  A branding statement noting your proven ability to manage large-scale projects will interest employers seeking project managers.  Your communication is focused on the customer or employer not yourself.

As a job seeker, your responsibility is to brand yourself as a solution to potential employer’s needs.  Hiring managers are tasked with having the right resources to effectively produce positive results.  Challenging opportunities within an organization where you can increase your responsibility and upward mobility will be the result of you being a valued contributor to that organization not the reason you are hired.  Brand yourself as a solution in your resume introduction and employers will pay attention.  Your objective will be met once you demonstrate you are the ideal brand for the organization.